About your Search

20121121
20121129
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9
security and medicare, make some defense cuts if you have to but we'd rather just see the rich get taxed and the near rich get taxed if we have to do that. >> the numbers do not add up, the left is being fundamentally dishonest. they are saying you don't have to cut social security or medicare or medicaid to get the deficit down, all you've got to do is tax the rich some more. they are recklessly suggesting that we go deeper and deeper and deeper into debt heading towards bankruptcy. the numbers, megyn are stunning. we have an unfunded liability for medicare of $42 trillion. an unfunded liability for social security of $20 trillion. and a further 20 trillion for unfunded pensions for federal employees, that adds up to $86 trillion which are committed to pay in the future and the money we do not have. therefore, you cannot just tax the rich to get rid of the deficit. you simply can't do that. the numbers don't add up. megyn: chris, what do you make of this, the president is now going to go out on what looks like sort of like a campaign stop on friday to pennsylvania. he already had this m
. i think they're fine with the sequester, to see deep defense cuts and not actually replace them before december 31. they haven't proposed any. jon: that is going to be interesting if that happens. a.b. stoddard from "the hill." thank you. >> thank you. jenna: now we're going to move overseas and this fox news alert out of egypt where we're seeing new clashes between protesters and police at a massive opposition rally against president morsi there. escalating violence is spreading across the city and much of egypt really for the last five days ever since the president's controversial decree granting himself nearance sew lieutenant power. that is a move many critics say is veiled attempt to turn egypt back into dictatorship. others say morsi is attempting to clean out the old guard and reaffirm a brand new move to a new government in egypt. something we're watching closely in the middle east. with pressure growing last night, morsi sat down last night with a five-hour meeting with the country's senior judges in an attempt he says to diffuse the situation but refused calls to withd
participated in the defense department. government doesn't build weaponry. private-sector does that. i presented the figures earlier today with the students and faculty members. in 1980, government contracting with the private sector represented about $47 billion. it was $513 billion in 2008. that is a bit of an increase. you are raising a good question. there are conflicts between government and business that are hard to work out, especially in areas of regulation. they do not like that. there are many ways that the government and the private sector have worked together to produce some of the great achievements in human history. >> please chummy in thanking professor rainey. >> thank you. >> to us for a program on retirement issues for the baby boomer generation. the event features author marc freedman. will open the lines and get your thoughts. organizations are more likely to cut matching contributions than retirement plans. more of that, not beginning at 2:00 p.m. eastern. the united nations security council is meeting to discuss the situation with israel and hamas and the gaza str
in the non-defense discretionary. the cost of security programs in that same time period has gone up 60%. the cost of mandatory programs is up 30%. i want to call your attention to one aspect progressives need to remind people. of the $1.50 trillion already in spending cuts, $900 billion comes from spending. we have given far more than when it comes to defense side. let's talk about those for a minute. the budget control act and sequestration would result in dramatic cuts to spending. we have heard a lot of talk about the impact it will have on our national defense. to believe that having ended one war in iraq and ending another in afghanistan that we cannot find savings in the pentagon, i do not think that is a fair assessment. there are savings to be had that will not compromise our national security. the simpson-bowles commission approach established in the outer years to lay the temptation to go back into the non-defense accounts when too much political pressure keeps you out of defense spending. i would hope any long-term agreement would improve that. on the non-defense side, i thi
a nato patriot air defense missiles. they're clearly worried about rockets and missiles coming into turkey from syria from the regime of bashar al assad. how worried should turkey be about engaging with syria in an actual war? >> wolf, the turks are very worried. and the turks are very disappointed. i've spent a fair amount of time in turkey this last year or so. they're very disappointed in washington's abdication. they feel that washington has left them holding the bag. the prime minister has always felt that he had kind of an inside relationship with president obama. but now the turks are left where they are. they are left with this running, shooting campaigns with the syrians. they're left with well over perhaps 120,000, 130,000 syrian refugees and they feel they have been left alone. the patriot missiles are the least we can do for them. >> thank you. >> thank you, wolf. >>> could air travel cost you more if the country goes over that so-called fiscal cliff? up next, the doomsday scenario some experts are now painting. i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. ad
association of people with disabilities, the disability rights education and defense fund, and the national disability rights network. in addition, it is supported by 21 different veterans groups including the wounded warrior project, the american legion, disabled american veterans and veterans of foreign war. president george h.w. bush, who signed the americans with disabilities act into law, has called for ratification of this treaty. there's been no more passionate advocate -- and in i'm so honord that he would consider devoting his energies and good name to our effort -- for ratification of the treaty than senator bob dole, a lifelong advocate for disability rights. we need to pass this in a tribute to bob dole, for his life of service to the state of kansas and to the nation as well as his heroic efforts on behalf of the disabled in the united states senate. these people have come together to support ratification of the treaty because they know it's critical for those living with disabilities in the united states and around the world. thanks to the a.d.a. and similar larks the united s
more time to build a deliverable nuclear weapon. secretary of defense and a estimate it would take two to three years to do so. in the latest international atomic energy agency report, based on its ongoing inspections iran's nuclear facility, particularly the fordo enrichment facility find that iran continues to expand enrichment pass the iranian patrician capacity. 20% levels which is closer to the 90% for weapons grades and iran continues to refuse to address the iaea's questions about the potential military dimensions of its nuclear program. and it continues to resist tougher international inspections known as the iaea additional protocol. so we believe that there is time and clearly there's an interest from all parties to reach a diplomatic solution. and after several rounds of negotiations between the p5+1, and iran, it looks as though there will be a new round of talks in the next month, but perhaps early in 2011. it's also clear that the two sides have put forward specific concrete proposal, but those proposals have some different ideas come particularly about the sequencing of
produced in afghanistan. iran is the first line of defense. americans can completely forget about the nuclear issue. the issue of fighting the drug trade, we are going to give you some -- that is outside of this negotiation that can work as a confidence-building measure. >> ok. thank you for those answers. another question we have has to do with the iaea's ongoing investigation on iran which i understand is not part of the p-5 plus one dialogue with iran. it's an issue with iaea, the director and the iranians. this has been going on for sometime. there have been news reports within the last month that the iaea and iran were going to meet in december, mid december, to discuss what's referred to the structured approach for investigating past activities. what -- so the question here is -- how can iran and the iaea resolve those issues, especially when there are serious concerns about potential military dimensions? how does iran get out of that without further criticism for their sanctions but at the same time clean its file? your thoughts. ambassador ekeus, this is an issue that the
: jeffrey white, a defense fellow at the washington institute for near east policy, says the syrian government is waging a deliberate scorched- earth strategy. >> it's trying to get at f.s.a. units that are embedded inside the population. where the people are, the f.s.a. tends to be. but it is also to punish the people, the civilians, for supporting the f.s.a. the relationship between the f.s.a. units and the people is critical to the success of the rebellion. >> warner: why don't the regime forces just go in these areas and take them and hold them? >> it basically can't do that any longer. six months ago, they could go anywhere in the country, effectively, where they wanted with armor and mechanized forces simply push the f.s.a. out of the area and reestablish a presence. the opposition is strong enough now that for the regime's ground forces to go into those areas is a punishing affair for the regime. >> warner: throughout this conflict, syrian president bashar al-assad has blamed the high civilian deaths on the rebels themselves, foreign agents and military accidents. >> ( transl
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)